Trinity, revelation and OT – 8

You may know that I (sporadically but vigourously!) bang the drum for Christ the eternal Mediator being the deliberately revealed, consciously known object of faith in the Old Testament.  Here are some posts on the issue.

Pete Myers read it and posted this.  And our further discussions are here and here.

By way of some kind of response, here are ten propositions that circle around some of the issues. (Fabricius eat your heart out). 

For those yawning right now, hold on for some grand hilarity next week – I’m on holidays and will post only frivolity.  For those fixing to flex their theological muscles, remember to play nice.

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8. The administration of Gentile inclusion is not a ‘model’ of progressive revelation.  The administration of Gentile inclusion is the new thing.

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In what follows I want to re-emphasize the following points:

 

I admit that one can speak of a progression from the knowledge of Christ.

 

I deny that one can speak of a progression to the knowledge of Christ.

 

The kind of ‘progression’ that I am arguing against is a ‘prog rev’ that assumes there is a prior and more rudimentary revelation than what is known in the Person of Christ

That said, I repeat my assertion:

 

The administration of Gentile inclusion is not a ‘model’ of progressive revelation.  The administration of Gentile inclusion is the new thing.

 

‘Progressive revelation’ is not illustrated by the Gentile inclusion mystery, this mystery is what has progressed according to the NT.

 

My frustration is with an assumed ‘prog rev’ model that gets away with all manner of assertions about what was unknown in OT times.  It does so on the assumption (both unproved and unproveable!) that the Gentile inclusion mystery is just one of a possibly infinite number of truths that seem plainly taught in the OT but were apparently completely obscure at the time.  My frustration increases exponentially when this assumed ignorance is said to include knowledge of Christ which the NT explicitly says was clear:

 

29 “Brothers, I may say to you with confidence about the patriarch David that he both died and was buried, and his tomb is with us to this day. 30 Being therefore a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him that he would set one of his descendants on his throne, 31 he foresaw and spoke about the resurrection of the Christ… (Acts 2:29-31)

 

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Posted on by Glen in covenant continuity, Doctrine of God, Old Testament, revelation, trinity

About Glen

I'm a preacher in Eastbourne, married to Emma.

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